Rift Valley fever: surveillance measures assessed

 

 

EFSA has completed its series of assessments on Rift Valley fever (RVF) with a scientific opinion looking at the effectiveness of surveillance and control measures in the EU .

 

The latest opinion follows two opinions published earlier this year which assessed respectively the risk of introduction of RVF to the EU and the impact of the disease in the French overseas department of Mayotte.

 

 

 

Background

 

Rift Valley fever is a vector-borne disease transmitted by mosquitoes to animals – domestic and wild ruminants and camels – and humans.

 

The vast majority of human infections result from direct or indirect contact with the blood or organs of infected animals. Such contact can occur during the care, assistance to childbirth or slaughter of infected animals, the elimination of carcasses or fetuses and perhaps from the ingestion of raw milk.

Human infection can also occur from the bite of infected mosquitoes (Aedes and Culex). Some occupational categories, such as breeders, shepherds, butchers and veterinarians, present a greater risk of contracting the infection.

 

The disease is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa and in the Arabian Peninsula, but has never been reported in continental Europe although its range is expanding. In 2018-19 it reappeared after ten years in Mayotte, where there have been outbreaks involving multiple human cases.

 

 

 

 

Source: EFSA

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

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